Basic Color Theory

The following information is intended as a basic understanding of color theory for creatives.

Color Theory For Creatives

Basic Color Wheel

Primary Colors – Red, Yellow and Blue are the basics of  color mixing. They can not be made on their own. From these three colors all the other colors are created.

Secondary Colors – Violet, Green, and Orange are the colors that are created secondly by mixing the primary colors together.

Color Theory For Creatives

Examples of  – Subtractive Color Theory  / Additive Color Theory

Subtractive Color – If you add its three primaries (Red, Green, Blue), the end result is white.

Additive Color – When the primaries cyan, magenta and yellow are mixed the end result is black. This is the color theory we are using here.

_____________________________

Color Schemes

Color Theory For Creatives
Complementary Colors –  Opposite each other on the color wheel. For instance the compliment of Blue is Orange, the compliment of Red is Green etc…

Color Theory For Creatives

Split Complementary –  Made by using a color AND the two colors next to its compliment. Such as by using Red, and then using Yellow and Blue.

Color Theory For Creatives

Triadic Color – Schemes are made by any three colors that appear an equal distant from each other on the color wheel, such as Red, Yellow, and Blue.

Color Theory For Creatives

Analogous – Color Scheme is made by colors next to each other on the color wheel.

Color Theory For Creatives

Monochromatic – Color Scheme is made from one color or hue with multiple values and intensities.

Color Theory For Creatives
Warm colors – Represent a feeling of warmth or heat such as Red, Orange, and Yellow.

Color Theory For Creatives

Cool Colors – Represent a feeling of coolness and chill, such as blue, blue green and violet.
Color Theory For Creatives

____________________________________
Value Scale – The amount of light and dark that is shown. The less value the lighter it is.

Color Theory For Creatives Color Theory For Creatives

Contrast – The difference in values. The strongest contrast can be seen by placing the two extremes next to each other. When two lesser extremes are next to each other they are said to have low contrast. The closer they are in value, the lower they are in contrast.

Color Theory For Creatives

Tints – Created by adding White to a value. In the case of hand-coloring a print the white would generally be added by using the paper and having a transparent color wash.

Color Theory For Creatives
Tones – Created by adding Black to a value. In the case of hand-coloring the artist will either add a bit of black to the color or use the existing shades of grey already in the image.

Elements of Design

Originally posted in July 2013.

Blacksmithing Art How To

Why blacksmiths? If you had a weekend to learn anything creative, what would you want to learn?

I asked this question on our Facebook group a few months back and was surprised by the answers. I assumed, and wrongly, that most people would put “drawing”, “painting”, “knitting”and so forth. But no, what I saw were things like “blacksmiths”, “glass blowing”, and “welding”. Things that I myself have been curious about but haven’t pursued.

I decided to begin a search, to find these people in our area of the country. The ones that use materials not always associated with the arts.

This past weekend such an opportunity dropped right into my lap. A group of blacksmiths were doing a demonstration in my small community of Humboldt, KS. Because I needed to work my day job, my husband was kind enough to go take some images and video for me. Admittedly, it took some coaxing to convince him to take time out of his day off, to take a few pics of the demo. When stating my case, I told him it wouldn’t take more than “thirty minutes to an hour tops!”. It wound up becoming more like a couple of hours. Not because they were slow, or he was pokey. It was that he simply found watching them incredibly interesting.

As the opportunities arise, I will share images and videos of other topics that people said they would like to know more about. If you know of any glassblowers, weavers, bookmakers etc.. in the area please drop me a line through this webpage, social media, or just email.

To start things off I would like to share with you a few images from Saturday afternoon with the “Free State Blacksmith Club”. https://www.facebook.com/freestateblacksmithclub


Blacksmiths Art How To

Artist How To Blacksmithing

Artist How To Blacksmithing

Lace SwatchesYou make swatches right? For every project? I know, I know… It seems like SUCH a hassle. And really what difference does blocking make? Well if you what to improve the appearance of your knitting, it can make a BIG difference.

If you don’t make swatches already, today is a great time to start! You want to make your swatch out of the same fiber you plan for your final project. This will help you see any possible problems ahead of time. Like BEFORE you invest days or weeks of time, and your hard earned money creating your gorgeous masterpiece.

Although it may seem annoying to create a swatch or sample, it can save you a great deal of time and frustration down the road.

Benefits of making a swatch:

  • It will tell you how the fiber works with your planned stitch.
  • You get an idea of the drape of the knit fabric.
  • Tells you if the fiber will hold up for its intended purpose.

Simply knit a square at least 4 inches in the same stitch pattern you intend to use. Because stockinette stitch can curl on it’s own, it helps to add a border of garter, or seed stitch. If you are using cables, lace, etc… in addition to stockinette or garter, include them. The point is to do a sample of the stitches used in your final project.

You will then block it by using the appropriate method. Be sure to check the yarn’s ball band for care information.

Benefits of blocking a swatch:

  • Tells you if the color in fiber will run.
  • You get to witness the drape and feel of the knitted fabric.
  • Tells you if fibers will shrink or stretch out of shape.

Basic methods of blocking:

  1. Spray Blocking – Gentlest of all the methods and works well for more delicate fibers. Pin swatch into shape and gently use a spray bottle to add moisture to the fibers.
  2. Wet Blocking/Immersion – Soaking your item in water, shaping, then allowing to dry. Works well with animal fibers, especially when using a lace stitch.
  3. Steam – Shape and add moisture to your item with steam from an iron or steamer. Cottons work well with this method. Do not use on man-made fibers. Do not touch your iron directly to the fiber, instead float the steam just above the surface allowing it soak into the fibers.

Blocking swatchesOnce you know the method you will try:

  • Select a surface to apply the blocked item, one that is appropriate to pin the item down and allowed to dry. Blocking mats, furniture, carpeted floor, or a quilted surface often work well.
  • Enough stainless steel pins to shape the swatch.
  • A clean, dry, safe location to leave the item to air dry for approximately 24 hours.

This post discusses just the tip of the iceberg, when it comes to blocking. Test things out and see what methods work best for you and your knitting needs.

If you want to be informed when our eBook on “Blocking Your Knits” becomes available, or updates on our other projects, please sign up here.

Yarn stash colors inspires

As I planned for 2017, I was asked the question “Who, living or dead, imaginary or real, inspires you? Who would I have as my board of adviser’s?”. Who inspires you to take it to the next level? When thinking about setting out on this adventure, the following people came to the forefront. (In no particular order)

Mark Lipinski http://marklipinski.com/

Mark Lipinksi, everyone’s favorite “Cupcake”! Although he is not a knitter, he is still important. As his says, “My life is just a series of awkward and humiliating moments separated by snacks.” He is a joy to hear and often says what I wish I had the nerve to say. He would be the one to tell me to be authentic, stop worrying what others thought, and eat the frosting first.

Marly Bird http://www.marlybird.com/

Marly is the national spokesperson for RedHeart yarn. I was not familiar with her until her grandmother and aunt told me about her in my day job (Library). Creatives are often told about a cousin, brother, or family member that also create in a said medium.  In this case, I only wish I had heard of her sooner. Her podcast brightens my day, makes me laugh and motivates me to continue creating.

Alice Starmore https://www.virtualyarns.com/

She was masterful. Her work beyond compare. Amazing. I can only aspire to be half the fiber artist she personifies.

Meg Swanson and Elizabeth Zimmermann http://www.schoolhousepress.com/

Meg Swanson and Elizabeth Zimmermann. Mother and daughter knitting heroes. Elizabeth is considered the American guru of knitting. She took something she instinctively knew how to do, made it accessible and shared it with the masses. Her daughter and granddaughter continue that legacy today.

Kaffee Fasset http://www.kaffefassett.com/

One word: “Color”

Mary Walker Phillips http://cprhw.tt/p/2AukR/

Mary Walker Phillips helped take knitting into the world of fine art. She showed that it was possible to be creative and expressive with simple needles and yarn. That it simply was “more”.

So there you have it. Seven people that help keep my creative juices flowing. Who would be on your list?

Bullet journal created and goals set. It’s time to get this year going!

knitting hat

The last few weeks I have been regrouping and reorganizing. I am bitten by the knitting bug, or is it re-infected? As I have mentioned before I tend to have Creative ADD.

If you are a knitter you probably know of Elizabeth Zimmerman. A Facebook group I joined is working our way through her “Knitting Workshop”. A new edition was recently released that has peaked interest.

First up is create a hat with Fair Isle accents. We gave ourselves two weeks to complete the hat, using Zimmermann’s guidelines.

Knit hat elizabeth zimmermann

Next up is making a sweater. Her method is such that it encourages you to design your own items. And since a purpose of all this is to offer knitting patterns here, it is a perfect match.

Another thing that has been on my to-do list was to make looms for my grandkids to use. OK, truth be told the grandkids are just an excuse. I want to do a bit of weaving with some of the less expensive yarns I have on hand. I mean I need to make sample…..right?!

I wound up making a few different sizes using the guidelines found at CraftLeftovers.

Weaving

penny

Just outside my studio/office window we have a frequent visitor or a doe. Husband has seen her spotted baby at least once, but I have not been so lucky.

Along with the rabbits, birds and squirrels its a regular menagerie! It is VERY cool to look up from my desk and see such a site. The deer comes around at least 2-3 times a day, that I notice.

apples bate

We have gotten were we put out grain a couple of times a day.  But I am sure the nearby apple tree is an added incentive for the frequent visits.

I have a small exhibit now hung in Chanute, KS at the Chanute Art Gallery. it will remain there throughout June. On the 16th there will be a public reception. As I am well aware I am not the best speaker or socially smooth person, so it all is being kept casual and low pressure.

"knit 1" Oil on Canvas

“Knit 1” Oil on Canvas

I still am working on the knitting designs and I have an eBook on knitting in progress.  But from the looks of an informal survey I conducted over the last 24 hours, it will need to be put on the back burner. Oh, I will still knit. But, realistically getting eBooks completed and on the market sometimes trumps our obsessions. So, it will get completed, just not before the things that pay the bills. As they say, “Girl gotta eat!”

Knitting Lace Shawl in Progress

Knitting Lace Shawl in Progress

Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com