Recently I worked on updating a price comparison list that I keep on hand for personal use. It includes oil painting materials from popular art suppliers such as Dick Blick, Utrecht, Jerry Artarama, Cheap Joes among a few others. Because I find this useful when ordering, I want to share this information with you. It is available in both a .xlsx (MS Excel includes comments related to product comparisons) and PDF file.

If you are already a subscriber we will be sending this to you shortly.

If you’re not – Get on the ball and subscribe today!

Click here to subscribe: http://eepurl.com/tuUtj

 

$7.99 eBook Sale Until August 12th Only!

(Regular Price $9.99)

Order your copy with PayPal.


***After sending payment with PayPal check your email for download information.***

Step-by-step examples and instructions show you how to create a realistic human head in polymer clay, grounded in fine art tradition.

You Will Discover:

  1. Tools and clays recommended by the author
  2. How to mix a wide variety of skin tones and ranges.
  3. Examples and demonstrations showing how-to create each portion of the human head.
  4. Two methods of sculpting heads will be covered, so you can find the method that works best for you.
  5. And much more!

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The beginning of the ultimate collection of information for the polymer clay artist working with the realistic human form

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Printed Version Available Through LuLu for $22.95

http://stores.lulu.com/bartonstudio

—–

Artist/Author Diane Dobson Barton’s work is in private and public collections around the globe. She holds a M.A. in Art and B.S.E.D. in Art Education from Pittsburg State University.

“This book is very thorough, well-written and illustrated. I think it is one of those must-have books for all levels. I feel it is great instruction for beginners, tips and methods for intermediates and reference for the more experienced sculptor.”

– Nina

“I wish I had this YEARS ago!”

– Katherine

“The large number of images make it easy to follow and understand.”

– Jerry

 

Recently I have been working on updating a price comparison list that I keep on hand for personal use. It includes prices from popular art suppliers such as Dick Blick, Utrecht, JerryArtarama, CheapJoes among a few others. Because I find this useful when ordering, I want to share it with you. It is available in both a .xlsx (MS Excel includes comments related to product comparisons) and PDF file.

If you are already a subscriber we will be sending this to you shortly. If you’re not – get on the ball and subscribe today!

Click here to subscribe: http://eepurl.com/tuUtj

*Note: This information focuses on painting in oils

Cons of Day job Artists

Last we looked at the “6 Pros: Day-Job for Artists” this time we will look at the cons.

  1. Energy – As we get older our energy is limited. If you use it up at your day-job, there is nothing left for your art.
  2. Time – A day-job can eat up your time, especially if you take your work home with you mentally.
  3. Commitment – Having a day-job is seen as not having a true commitment to your calling as an artist.
  4. Quality – Both  day-job and art can suffer by spreading yourself too thin and not being fully focusing on either.
  5. Rut – Being in a tough routine can wipe you out both mentally and physically can make your creativity stifled.
  6. Security – It can be easy to get used to the illusion of security of a day-job, making it easy for one to loose their identity as an artist all-together.

Least we forget we are not alone in the struggle, a number of successful artists have also juggled a 9-5 quandary at one time or another.

Famous Day-Jobs:

  • William Faulkner wrote “As I Lay Dying” in the afternoon before working at night as a supervisor at a University Power Plant.
  • Joseph Heller (Author of “Catch 22”) Did magazine advertising by day and was a write by night.
  • Joseph Cornell (artist and sculptor) worked 9-5 in a Manhattan Textile studio.
  • Keith Haring worked as a busboy.
  • Jasper Johns was employed as a bookstore clerk to make ends meet.

 

Pros of a day job for artists

The reality is most artist work a day-job of one kind or another. Finances, time management and self expression require continual juggling. The myth of the artist working as he or she chooses, not needing to concern themselves with finances and always staying creatively challenged, is difficult in reality.

In the next two posts I will explore the pros and cons faced by artists in having a day-job. First let’s look at the pros:

  1. Schedule – Working around a day-job schedule forces you to focus in on what is most important in your art. You tend to waste less time on things that do not matter to the big picture.
  2. Inspiration – The people and events that you are a part of give inspiration you would not otherwise have. The fact is if you work with the public much you will find yourself often saying, “You just can NOT make this stuff up!”.
  3. Interaction – Working as an artist can be a solitary act. Working a day-job forces you to interact face-to-face with other breathing humans.
  4. Equipment – If you are fortunate you will have equipment openly available to you that you could not afford on your own.
  5. Financial Freedom – When you do not need to worry about a roof over your head because the day-job finances it, you feel freer to explore your creative options. That less than desirable commission can be turned down in favor of pursuing your own projects.
  6. Benefits – Insurance, vacation, sick leave and paid training can be difficult to come by when you work exclusively on your art. If you work it right you can use this paid time to your advantage.

To have a day-job can be a tough personal choice, one that needs to be weighed by an individuals situation. Next we will explore the cons.

 

So supposedly the ideal image to have on Pinterest for marketing is vertical.  It helps to gain more exposure due to the layout. But HOW do you go about making one fast and inexpensive?

I have Photoshop and Gimp, both of which can do pretty amazing things.  But I prefer to use PicMonkey these days for quick edits that do not require more complicated results.

Pinterest How-to VerticalLooking at JUST creating the layout that is necessary, lets get started!

  1. First you need the images you want to include in the collage.  It is a good idea to have them where you can easily locate them, such as on a folder in the desktop, or on a jump-drive.
  2. Go to Picmonkey.com and click on Create a Collage, click Open Photos and add the ones you want to include.
  3. Go down to the icon below Create a Collage, choose Biggie Smalls with the largest number of squares on the right. You can easily change the number of whichever one you choose, but for ease of starting lets stick with that has the most.
  4. Click Open and drop and drag the images where you want them. If you want to add text in an open space keep that in mind and do not place images in each one. (To remove a square go to that square and click on the X to delete.  To add drop and drag you image to the space between the squares)
  5. Save the image by hitting Save, then Save Photo – Again in an place that you can easily locate.
  6. Close the project by hitting the X in the upper right hand side of the PicMonkey work area. Not the browser “X”
  7. Open PicMonkey again and this time click on Edit a Photo and open the collage you just made.
  8. Click on Crop and adjust to create the shape you desire, click on Apply.
  9. Add any text by clicking on the P, choose the desired font and click on Add Text. A text Box will appear on the screen. Make necessary adjustments in the size of the font and location of the text box.
  10. Hit Save, then Save Photo again to your desired location.

TA-DAH!  Now you can upload the image you just made to your Blog or Pinterest.

I strongly believe that drawing is the foundation of visual arts. If you do not have the necessary drawing skills your work suffers. So I have pulled this eBook out of our archives to help flex those drawing muscles!

fist drawing

_______________

drawingzine_007$4.99

eBook Download – Go here for more information and to purchase!

 

Digging

Digging For Info

Something I have noticed about people lately: Either you are a “Digger”, or you are not. You either wait for people to spoon-feed you information/skills or you seek it out and dig it up. Those waiting for someone else to hand them over the keys to knowing how to do anything are going to be in for a long wait. You have to show up, you have to DO the work, you have to get your hands dirty!

Go forth and DIG!

OpaqueProjector

Vintage Monster!

Is it OK to use an opaque projector as a tool for creating representational art? It is ingrained in me to say “No”. Being able to draw and see as an artist is the basis of all fine artist. One does not want to skip past this important step. When I was first serious about learning to draw having an opaque projector was not an option, financially. For this I am thankful.

I posed this question on my facebook page(s) – Artist-How-To and Diane Dobson Barton. People proposed “Professional artist use one all the time.”, “It saves time.”,  “The master’s used similar devices for centuries.” The problem as I see it arises when an artist uses a projection without the necessary skills to make it work in the end. When it is used as a crutch rather than a tool.

I have also heard people say it “saves time”.  But if you can draw well, drawing is quicker.  If you can not draw well, one must reason that you can also not see well. Seeing well is the basis of creating all representational art.

Vintage Projector

Vintage Projector

One can drive a car with cruise control and an automatic transmission just fine. But if they never learn to steer they won’t get very far. I sincerely wish I could say knowing someone uses one does not ruffle my feathers and make red flags pop up in my mind. Maybe I am just too old school?

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